fbpx
Connect with us

Texas Tribune

Woman who opened fire at Houston megachurch killed

Published

on

by Pooja Salhotra, The – 2024-02-11 18:12:09

SUMMARY: A female shooter attacked Joel Osteen's Lakewood Church in Houston on Sunday afternoon, causing multiple casualties before being fatally shot by off-duty officers. Accompanied by a young child who was critically injured, the woman entered moments before a Spanish-language service, wearing a trench coat and carrying a rifle, claiming she had a bomb. No explosives were found. Houston Mayor John Whitmire praised first responder collaboration; Pastor Osteen and Texas Governor Greg Abbott reacted with sorrow. The incident recalls other U.S. church shootings, highlighting debates around gun control and church security in Texas.

—————-

FULL ARTICLE:


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Read the original article

Advertisement

The post Woman who opened fire at Houston megachurch killed appeared first on TexasTribune.org.

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Texas Tribune

Officials investigating what caused Texas Panhandle wildfires

Published

on

by Jayme Lozano Carver and Emily Foxhall, The – 2024-03-01 22:35:52



—————-

FULL ARTICLE:


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Read the original article

The post Officials investigating what caused Texas Panhandle wildfires appeared first on TexasTribune.org.

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Texas Tribune

As wildfires rage, Fritch residents seek respite at church

Published

on

by Carlos Nogueras Ramos, The – 2024-03-01 21:38:16

SUMMARY: As wildfires ravaged the Texas Panhandle, Fritch resident Deana McBroom and her family hastily fled, saving only a box of paperwork. Over 1 million acres were scorched, marking this as the largest wildfire in Texas history. The McBrooms, now temporary residents at their daughter's house in Borger, visit a local church for sustenance and support. Fritch, with a population of 2,300, remains largely off-limits as officials assess the extent of the devastation. The fires, fueled by fierce winds, took two lives and incinerated at least 50 homes in Fritch alone. Residents like the McBrooms and the Cogswells sift through remnants, facing the loss of homes and personal history, as they contemplate an uncertain future.

—————-

FULL ARTICLE:


Advertisement

A burned truck sits on lot where the fire went through while areas behind appear to be untouched Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Fritch, Texas.

Advertisement

Deana McBroom holds one of their baby goats that survived the fire Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Fritch, Texas. Most of their livestock survived the fire.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

The burned remnants of Dan Cogswell's shed Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Fritch, Texas.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Read the original article

The post As wildfires rage, Fritch residents seek respite at church appeared first on TexasTribune.org.

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Texas Tribune

Texas wildfires devastate state’s agriculture economy

Published

on

by Alejandra Martinez, The – 2024-03-01 16:00:54

SUMMARY: Texas has been struck by its largest wildfire in history, ravaging over 1 million acres and affecting the agriculture sector, a key component of the state's economy. The blaze killed thousands of livestock, destroyed crops, and damaged infrastructure. Agriculture contributes 9% to Texas' gross state product, and over 85% of the state's cattle are in the Panhandle. The disaster exacerbates existing challenges, like drought-induced herd reductions and decreased beef production. Communities are rallying to help, offering discounts on supplies, donations, and shelter for displaced livestock. State grants and resources like the Texas Department of Agriculture's Hay Hotline are aiding recovery, although rebuilding operations will take time.

—————-

FULL ARTICLE:


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Pierson Sparks unloads hay at a donation site Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Borger, Texas.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Read the original article

The post Texas wildfires devastate state's agriculture economy appeared first on TexasTribune.org.

Advertisement

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Continue Reading

News from the South

Trending