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Some Texas schools try new way to teach math to students

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by Brian Lopez, The – 2024-02-12 06:00:00

SUMMARY: Dallas ISD has adopted a new math curriculum, Eureka Math, that moves away from focusing solely on standardized test performance. Eran McGowan's third-grade class exemplifies this shift, encouraging students to explain their problem-solving process in front of peers. The collaborative approach aims to deepen students' understanding of math concepts rather than just memorizing equations. Texas students' math proficiency has lagged post-pandemic; only 45% passed with pre-pandemic levels not yet recovered. This shortfall may impact future workforce competencies and lifetime earnings. There's hope that Eureka Math, already showing positive results and adopted in other Texas districts, will improve scores. Amid these changes, Texas faces teacher shortages, which complicates the implementation of new strategies.

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Third grade teacher Eran McGowan watches students demonstrate their answers to the class at the Eddie Bernice Johnson STEM Academy in Dallas, Texas on Feb. 5, 2024.

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Third grade student Alaiyah B. demonstrates how she got her answer to Eran McGowan's class at the Eddie Bernice Johnson STEM Academy in Dallas, Texas on Feb. 5, 2024.

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Teaching challenges

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Principle Umoja Turner poses for a portrait inside the Eddie Bernice Johnson STEAM Academy in Dallas, Texas on Feb. 5, 2024.

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A new way to learn

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Third grade teacher Eran McGowan helps students work through math problems at the Eddie Bernice Johnson STEM Academy in Dallas, Texas on Feb. 5, 2024.

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Third grade teacher Eran McGowan watches students demonstrate their answers to the class at the Eddie Bernice Johnson STEM Academy in Dallas, Texas on Feb. 5, 2024.

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The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

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Officials investigating what caused Texas Panhandle wildfires

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by Jayme Lozano Carver and Emily Foxhall, The – 2024-03-01 22:35:52



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The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

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As wildfires rage, Fritch residents seek respite at church

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by Carlos Nogueras Ramos, The – 2024-03-01 21:38:16

SUMMARY: As wildfires ravaged the Texas Panhandle, Fritch resident Deana McBroom and her family hastily fled, saving only a box of paperwork. Over 1 million acres were scorched, marking this as the largest wildfire in Texas history. The McBrooms, now temporary residents at their daughter's house in Borger, visit a local church for sustenance and support. Fritch, with a population of 2,300, remains largely off-limits as officials assess the extent of the devastation. The fires, fueled by fierce winds, took two lives and incinerated at least 50 homes in Fritch alone. Residents like the McBrooms and the Cogswells sift through remnants, facing the loss of homes and personal history, as they contemplate an uncertain future.

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A burned truck sits on lot where the fire went through while areas behind appear to be untouched Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Fritch, Texas.

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Deana McBroom holds one of their baby goats that survived the fire Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Fritch, Texas. Most of their livestock survived the fire.

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The burned remnants of Dan Cogswell's shed Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Fritch, Texas.

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Texas wildfires devastate state’s agriculture economy

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by Alejandra Martinez, The – 2024-03-01 16:00:54

SUMMARY: Texas has been struck by its largest wildfire in history, ravaging over 1 million acres and affecting the agriculture sector, a key component of the state's economy. The blaze killed thousands of livestock, destroyed crops, and damaged infrastructure. Agriculture contributes 9% to Texas' gross state product, and over 85% of the state's cattle are in the Panhandle. The disaster exacerbates existing challenges, like drought-induced herd reductions and decreased beef production. Communities are rallying to help, offering discounts on supplies, donations, and shelter for displaced livestock. State grants and resources like the Texas Department of Agriculture's Hay Hotline are aiding recovery, although rebuilding operations will take time.

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Pierson Sparks unloads hay at a donation site Friday, March. 1, 2024, in Borger, Texas.

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The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

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