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Uvalde families sue gun manufacturer, Instagram, Activision

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by By Pooja Salhotra and Berenice Garcia, The – 2024-05-24 15:28:57

SUMMARY: Several Uvalde families are suing Daniel Defense, the gun company whose AR-15 style rifle was used in the tragic Robb Elementary shooting, alleging negligence and wrongful death. Additional lawsuits target Meta (Instagram's parent company) and Activision, claiming these companies marketed firearms to the young shooter before he was 18. The suits argue these firms groom adolescents for violence, condoning and promoting the criminal use of AR-15s. Family attorney Josh Koskoff previously secured a landmark $73 million settlement for Sandy Hook victims, setting a precedent for challenging firearm manufacturers' legal immunity. The legal actions coincide with ongoing criticism of law enforcement's response to the Uvalde incident.

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The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Texas Tribune

Texas Medical Board adopts abortion guidance

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by By Eleanor Klibanoff, The – 2024-06-21 11:37:24

SUMMARY: The Texas Medical Board has issued new guidance on interpreting the state's abortion laws. The guidelines reduce paperwork but do not specify conditions under which abortions are legal. The Board, responding to concerns from doctors and others, removed a controversial provision about patient transfers. Board Chair Dr. Sherif Zaafran noted that some issues remain unaddressed and emphasized that the board lacks authority to fully resolve them. The guidance mainly details documentation requirements and asserts that doctors can act before a medical emergency becomes imminent. Despite some revisions, critics argue the guidance is still vague and may lead to legal challenges.

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The final guidance

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Initial feedback 

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SCOTUS allows gun restrictions on domestic violence suspects

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by By William Melhado, The – 2024-06-21 09:37:13

SUMMARY: In an 8-1 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that protective orders can bar those accused of domestic violence from owning firearms. The case involved Zackey Rahimi, a Texan who argued that restricting firearm access under a domestic violence order was unconstitutional. The ruling overturned a 5th U.S. Circuit Court decision which had favored Rahimi, emphasizing that such firearm laws are consistent with historical regulations preventing harm. Advocates stress that gun presence in domestic violence situations increases homicide risk by 500%. Domestic violence incidents and related homicides in Texas have surged, highlighting the ruling's significance.

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The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

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Fewer Texas students complete FAFSA after bungled rollout

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by By Sneha Dey, Data reporting by Elijah Nicholson-Messmer, The – 2024-06-21 05:00:00

SUMMARY: Many Texas high school graduates are entering summer without completing the FAFSA, crucial for seeking college financial aid. A revamped form introduced complications, delaying colleges' financial aid timelines. As of June 7, FAFSA completion rates among Texas graduates dropped by 8.8 percentage points, affecting nearly 30,000 students, a sharper decline than during the COVID-19 pandemic. Experts like Bill DeBaun and Bryan Ashton express concerns that fewer FAFSA submissions will reduce college enrollment, especially among low-income students. Despite this, Texas maintains high completion rates due to a 2021 law requiring FAFSA submission for high school graduation. The challenges may additionally cause “summer melt.”

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